We Must Build a Foundation Before We Can Build Walls

A few nights ago, I couldn’t sleep and ended up watching a show about the construction of the Burj Khalifa, the tallest building in the world. In the show, they mentioned that the design used approx. 50% the amount of steel used in the construction of the Empire State Building, which is half the height of the Burj Khalifa. That fact initially surprised me, before realizing it was a simply matter of improved design efficiency and building a better foundation which could tolerate higher loads. That concept brought me back to one of our principal philosophies we apply at OSSPT, which is to ensure we build a better foundation of movement quality, before we ever increase movement quantity. The foundation of physical therapy should be about correcting faulty movement patterns.

“Tarzan, to me, is the epitome of fitness.  The guy is strong, agile and quick.  He can run, jump, climb and swing through trees.  If we take a person who moves well and put them on a Crossfit type of training program, we turn them into Tarzan.  If we take that same program and give it to the majority of people in society who move poorly, we turn them into a patient.”

– Gray Cook

Faulty movement patterns are the underlying reason behind ALL chronic conditions and many acute injuries. Without fixing the foundation, we are fighting a losing battle and eventually the walls will come crashing down, whether that be a recurrence of previous injury, worsening of current symptoms, or simply developing a new injury complaint. The number one risk for musculoskeletal injury is a previous injury, clearly indicating that something we are doing in the rehabilitation process is wrong and insufficient.

Ever wonder why your hip or knee become arthritic on one side and not the other? Ever wonder why your neck or low back are not getting better with years of adjustments, massages, etc? Ever wonder how you developed bone spurs in your your foot, heel, hip, shoulder, etc? The most likely answer is that you moved incorrectly, year after year, until finally, you developed structural changes, and then pain. As Gray Cook asks, are you moving poorly because you are in pain? Or are you in pain because you are moving poorly? We know that structural changes begin before we start experiencing pain, and we know that structural changes happen when we move improperly; therefore, we know that faulty movements lead to pain overtime. Here’s the great news… we can change how we move and if we change how we move we have an excellent opportunity to eliminate the pain cycle once and for all. baby squat

Try this quick test… perform a squat just like the kiddo in the picture to the right. If you can’t do it as well as that infant, then you are predisposed to injury. It’s as simple as that. We must squat, lunge, walk, climb stairs, push, pull, reach, etc. with proper mechanics, not because we are attempting to be elite level athletes, but simply because we are human beings and we must successfully build a solid movement foundation before we can build the walls of strength, flexibility, etc. around it.

“Success is doing the ordinary things extraordinarily well.”

– Jim Rohn

 Not sure if you move correctly or not, schedule an evaluation with me and we will perform the Functional Movement Screen, a reliable and valid tool, to determine what weak links you may have that could eventually be the crack in your foundation, and then provide you with the proper tools to fix it before it becomes a bigger problem.

 

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